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The Project

Location of the Anafon Hydro

The site of the Anafon Hydro lies in the Anafon valley in the Carneddau massif which rises immediately south of the village of Abergwyngregyn just inside the northern boundary of the Snowdonia National Park and 4 km west-south-west of Llanfairfechan. The Afon Anafon originates in Llyn Anafon, a small, disused reservoir 5.1 km south-east of Abergwyngregyn village. The river descends rapidly for 3.3 km through open moorland and then through Coedydd Aber Forest to join the Afon Rhaeadr Fawr immediately upstream of Bontnewydd. The two tributaries form the Afon Aber which runs a further 2.3 km through the village and farmland to enter the eastern end of the Menai Strait at Traeth Lafan. The total descent of the river from Llyn Anafon is 558 m over 5.6 km.

The intake weir will be situated 1.4 km downstream of the lake providing a catchment of 5.05 km2 and a head of 230m.

Map 1


Map 2


Map 3

Technical Information

The Anafon Hydro is a high-head run-of-river scheme. A low weir feeds water into a buried 3 km pipe. The pipeline descends a total of 230 vertical metres, initially following the northern bank of the river which it crosses on a pipe bridge to the southern bank before entering the Coedydd Aber Forest. Here, it follows the forest track down to the turbine house located just inside the entrance to the Aber Falls National Nature Reserve.

The maximum power output is 270 KW but output is subject to variation in proportion to the flow of water in the river. Power produced by the turbine is exported to the National Grid via a new line to existing power lines approximately 150 m from the turbine house. This required an upgrade of the existing lines from the substation in the village about 1 km below the connection point.

A full feasibility study was conducted by John Howarth (John Howarth Hydropower Services), Dr Rod Gritten (Gritten Ecology) and subcontracted specialists. The resulting Environmental Statement was the basis for applications to Natural Resources Wales (NRW) for abstraction and impoundment licences and to the Snowdonia National Park Planning Authority. Planning consent was received in December 2013 and the Abstraction and Impoundment licences were issued in July 2014.

Financing the Project

Initial project development costs, including feasibility studies, planning consent application, application for water abstraction and impoundment licences, advice on administrative structures, legal fees, cessation agreement for grid connection, etc., were covered by grants, resources and support provided by Ynni’r Fro, Abergwyngregyn Regeneration Company, the Cooperative Community Energy Challenge, the National Trust, Gwynedd Werdd, the Waterloo Foundation, Wales Cooperative Centre, the Cooperative Enterprise Hub and Cooperatives UK.

John Howarth Hydropower Services estimated the design and construction costs for the Anafon project at £1.25 million made up as follows:
  • Project development costs - £60,000
  • Project construction costs - £1,055,000
  • Contingency - £134,000
In the event, the Anafon Hydro was constructed for a total of £1.1 M, almost exactly in line with John Howarth’s estimate. The capital funding for the project came from two sources. On September 13th 2014, Ynni Anafon Energy launched a community share issue which attracted investment of £450,900 by its closure in March 2015, with the majority of shareholders living locally but with others from across the UK and abroad. Additional funds were raised through a bank loan of £545,000 from Charity Bank, repayable over 15 years.



Click below to see confirmation of consent documents;




Building the Anafon Hydro

Following a tendering process in 2014, two contractors were engaged to build the hydro: Gelli Civil Engineering to build the turbine house and the weir and Kevin Williams Earthworks to install the pipeline.

After a village ceremony on 4 May 2015 at which the oldest and youngest residents born in Abergwyngregyn together cut the first turf, Gelli arrived on site on 5 May to commence work on the turbine house. Kevin Williams started work on the pipeline in the Anafon valley on 11 May. Construction proceeded smoothly and both contractors finished work at the end of September 2015.

However, Scottish Power failed to schedule the work to install their substation in the turbine house and to upgrade the power lines from the village to coincide with the completion of construction. They commenced work on the substation in the middle of November but the work on the power line upgrade did not start until towards the end of that month by which time the weather had broken causing further delays.

The upgrade and connection to the grid were eventually completed on 27 November 2015 and work to commission the plant started immediately. Commissioning was completed on 30 November with the successful completion of the G59 test and the Anafon Hydro commenced full generation and export of electricity to the grid on 1 December, one month earlier than our original target date.

Income from the Anafon Hydro

For the first 20 years, our financial projections indicate that the Anafon Hydro will generate gross revenue of approximately £200,000 a year, made up from the sale of electricity and the Government subsidy to renewable energy generation, the Feed-in-Tariff. Thereafter, the income will be derived solely from the sale of electricity except in the unlikely event that there are further government subsidies.

After servicing our bank loan and the deduction of running costs, profits that are generated during the first two years of operation will be allocated to building up a number of reserves in accordance with the conditions of our bank loan and to cover emergencies. From the third year, YAE will commence payment of interest to our shareholders and disposable profits will be transferred to the charity, Dŵr Anafon, for distribution for community benefit.

For the first 15 years until our bank loan is paid off, we expect these disposable profits to be in the region of £30,000 to £40,000 p.a. From Year 16 to Year 20 when our Feed in Tariff ends, this figure should rise to in the region of £80,000 to £90,000. However, during this period, we are committed, under the terms of our lease, to make a donation of £25,000 p. a. to the National Trust specifically for conservation work in the Carneddau massif in which the hydro is located. The amount available for local community benefit will therefore rise to approximately £55,000 to £65,000.

After Year 20 when the Feed in Tariff ends, income will depend on the price of electricity which cannot be predicted.



Photographic record of the construction of the Anafon Hydro

Work starts on site!

Preparatory work on site will start on 3 March 2015. This will include felling a number of mature conifers in the Aber Forest to create a 100 m long corridor for the pipeline as it enters the forest. The work is expected to take about 3 weeks.

Paul Smith (Alfa Tree Services) and his team start work clearing the corridor.

Work begins Clearing the pipeline route in Coedydd Aber Forest  3 March 2015
Paul discusses the work with Kevin Williams, pipeline contractor, John Howarth, project engineer, and Dr Rod Gritten. ecological clerk of works.

Final survey of the pipeline route.

Dr Rod Gritten, Kevin Williams, and John Howarth conduct a final survey of the pipeline route through the heath in the Anafon Valley, a particulary sensitive section. As a reesult of this survey, minor changes were made to the route.

Final survey of pipeline route  Rod Gritten Ecologist Kevin Williams Contractor John Howarth  3 March 2015

The weather closes in!

Final survey of pipeline route   the weather closes in  3 March 2015

Felling complete along pipeline route through Coedydd Aber forest

Alfa Trees Services completed felling the 100m section of the pipeline route through mature Sitka Spruce into Coedydd Aber forest on 17 March 2015, 3 days ahead of schedule.

Alfa Tree Services complete felling along pipeline route - 17  March 2015

Independent technical assessment of the Anafon Hydro Project

Derwent Hydro engineers carry out an independent technical assessment of the Anafon Project for Charity Bank, our probably main lender.

Derwent Hydro engineers carry out an independent technical assessment  March 2015

YAE chooses contractors to build the Anafon Hydro Project

Following the tendering process, the Board will be awarding the contracts to build the Anafon Hydro to two contractors. Gelli Civil Engineering, Tremadog, will build the weir and turbine house and Kevin Williams Earthworks, Bontddu near Dolgellau, will install the pipeline.

Gelli Civil Engineering have wide experience of civil engineering work near and in rivers and Kevin Williams installed the pipeline for the Harnog Hydro and so is experienced in pipeline installation and reinstatement work in sensitive environments.

Both contractors expect to start work in early May.

NRW ecologists, reserve managers and regulators on site

NRW ecologists, reserve managers and regulators meet John Howarth, Dr Rod Gritten and our contractors for a final site meeting to discuss the Construction Method Statement - 1 April

NRW ecologists reserve managers and regulators meet John Howarth Dr Rod Gritten and our contractors for a final site meeting to discuss the Construction Method Statement

Underway at last!

The Abergwyngregyn community gathers at the turbine house site for the ceremony to cut the first turf - 4 May.

Under way at last Gathering for Cutting the first Turf at the Turbine House Site 4 May 2015

Eirlys Williams and Emily Jones (4 months old), the oldest and youngest current residents born in Aber, cut the first turf.

Oldest Eirlys and youngest Emily residents born in Abergwyngregyn cut the first turf at the Turbine House site 4 May 2015

The contractors start work.

The turbine house and weir contractors, Gelli Civil Engineering, arrive at the turbine house site - 5 May.

The contractors arrive on the Turbine House site 5 May 2015

The site cabins go in.

The cabins are installed 5 May 2015

Artist's impressions of how the turbne house will look by Aber resident, Helen Flook.

The turbine house from the gate into the Aber Falls reserve.

Turbine House from the gate into the Reserve 5 May 2015

The view of the turbine house as you return from the Falls along the main footpath.

Turbine House  view returning down the path from the Aber Falls

7 May 2015

The access track to the Turbine House goes in

The access track to the Turbine House goes in 7 May 2015

9 May 2015

The bank is cut back to accommodate the Turbine House

The bank is cut back to accomodate the Turbine House 9 May 2015

12 May 2015

Excavation for the Turbine House continues under the watchful eye of archaeologist, Ian Brooks, carrying out his watching brief. The only finds so far: two Northern Dairies milk bottles!

Excavation for the Turbine House observed by Ian Brooks archaeological contractor 12 May 2015

14 May 2015

Excavation for the foundations of the turbine base is complete.

Excavation for the turbine base 14 May 2015

The outflow pipe from the turbine is installed.

The outflow pipe from the turbine is installed 12 May 2015

16 May 2015

Shuttering for the foundations of the turbine base and the first concrete is poured.

Shuttering and concrete for the turbine base 21 May 2015

26 May 2015

Excavation for the sub-station foundations.

Excavation of the substation foundation 26 May 2015

29 May 2015

The sub-station floor is cast.

Slab for the substation underfloor is cast 29 May 2015

John Howarth inspects the foundations.

John Howarth inspects the foundations 29 May 2015

10 June 2015

The brickwork for the sub-station underfloor cable ducts is completed - 8 June.

Cable trench brickwork for the sub-station now complete 8 June 2015

In the meantime, Kevin Williams, our pipeline contractor, has been busy on the pipeline in the Anafon Valley.

Ten metre sections of the polyethylene pipe are welded together to form 130m lengths ready for installation.

Pipes are welding for the pipeline 21 May 2015

130m lengths of pipe awaiting installation 29 May 2015

The welding machine in action.

Pipe welding machine in action 1 June 2015

A temporary track is put in across the river.

Temporary track across Afon Anafon 2 June 2015

Work starts on the installation of the pipeline on the mountain - 2 June.

Work starts on intalling the pipeline on the mountain 2 June 2015

The trench for the first 130m length of pipe is opened - 3 June.

The trench for the first 130m of pipe is open 3 June 2015

The pipeline is dragged up the mountain

The pipe is dragged up 3 June 2015

and drawn into its trench.

The pipe is drawn into the trench 3 June 2015

The first section in position in its trench.

The first 130m of pipe in its trench 3 June 2015

The trench is filled

The first 130m of pipe is covered over 7 June 2015 June 2015

The trench for the second 130m section of pipe is opened.

The trench is prepared for the second section of pipe 9 June 2015

The first 2 sections of pipeline are welded together.

Welding the connector between the first and second 130m sections of pipe 9 June 2015

15 June 2015

Adjusting the reinforcement for the turbine house floor.

Adjusting the reinforcement for the turbine house floor 15 June 2015

16 June 2015

The turbine house floor is cast.

The floor of the turbine house is cast 16 June 2015

In the meantime, on the mountain:

The first 400m of the pipeline is installed on the southern bank of the Anafon River.

The first 400m of pipeline is in  10 June 2015

And reinstatement is underway.

Reinstatement of the mountain side is underway 16 June 2015

The reinstated pipeline route begins to recover.

The reinstated mountainside 15 June 2015

The first section of pipe is installed on the north bank of the Anafon.

The first section of pipe is laid on the north bank of the Afon Anafon 16 June 2015

Work begins clearing the corridor through the forest for the pipeline.

Work begins to clear the pipeline corridor through Coedydd Aber Forest 16 June 2015

23 June 2015

The walls of the substation almost halfway there.

Walls of the substation well on their way 23 June 2015

The base for the generator is cast.

The base for the generator is cast 23 June 2015

Meanwhile, on the mountain:

The pipeline on the south bank of the Afon Anafon is installed and the mountainside reinstated.

Mountain side on the south bank of Afon Anafon reinstated 24 June 2015

Levels for the pipeline along the initial sections of the pipe below the weir are particularly critical as the drop is only 1 in 165. John Howarth makes a final check of the levels.

John Howarth conducts the final survey of the last section of the pipeline 16 June 2015

The cut for the pipeline comes within sight of the weir location (by the trees in the background).

The benching for the pipeline approaches the site of the weir 23 June 2015

The pipe is eased into its trench. Kevin Williams has only one more short section of polyethylene pipe and the steel pipe crossing the river to install before he moves to the forest. Gelli will install the final section of the pipeline connecting to the weir when this is built.

The penultimate section of pipe below the weir is eased into its trench 23 June 2015

The installation of the pipeline on the north bank of the Anafon nears completion with much of the route reinstated.

Pipe line on Anafon north bank almost complete 22 June 2015

26 June 2015

Emyr Roberts, CEO Natural Resources Wales, and Derek Stephen, Energy Deliver Programme Manager, visited the project yesterday.

Aeron, Gelli's Site Manager, explains the site to Emyr Roberts.

Emyr Roberts CEO of NRW visits the Anafon Hydro 25 June 2015

Emyr Roberts and Gavin Gatehouse at the Turbine House site.

Emyr Roberts CEO of NRW with Gavin Gatehouse 25 June 2015

29 June 2015

Last few courses of bricks on the turbine house substation.

Turbine House substation  the last few courses 29 June 2015

Meanwhile, on the mountain:


Steel pipe for the river crossing is delivered on site.

Steel pipe for the river crossing delivered on site 28 June 2015

The pipe is positioned across the river.

Positioning the pipe across the Afon Anafon 29 June 2015

30 June 2015

The pipes are aligned for the final connection at the pipe bridge.

Adjusting alignment for the final connection 30 June 2015

The connector is bolted up.

Bolting up the second connection 30 June 2015

All connections completed on the pipe bridge.

The pipe bridge is connected 30 June 2015

The pipe bridge across Afon Anafon in position.

The pipe bridge across Afon Anafon in position 30 June 2015

3 July 2015

Turbine house substation roof slab is cast.

Turbine house substation roof slab cast  3 July 2015

Last few courses of blocks on the turbine room walls.

Last few courses of blocks on the turbine room walls 3 July 2015

Meanwhile, on the mountain:

Pipe bridge completed and the surrounding slopes reinstated.

Pipe bridge in place and slopes reinstated 3 July 2015

The pipe bridge.

Pipe bridge in position 3 July 2015

and in Coedydd Aber Forest:

Kevin Williams moves his team down from the mountain and the pipe welding station is set up again.

Pipe welding starts in Coedydd Aber Forest  2 July 2015

Pipe welding starts in Coedydd Aber Forest   2 July 2015

Welding the connector between thinner and thicker walled pipe.

Welding the connector from thinner to thicker walled pipe 2 July 2015

6 July 2015

The reinstated heath is recovering well after 3 weeks.

Reinstated heath recovering well after 3 weeks 6 June 2015

15 July 2015

Rafters supporting the sedum (turf) roof of the turbine house are installed.

The rafters supporting the sedum turf roof are installed 15 July 2015

The turbine house comes into view as you return from the Aber Falls.

The first sight of the turbine house returning down the Aber Falls path  15 July 2015

Meanwhile, on the pipeline route:

The cutting for the pipeline trench from the forest reaches the end of the pipeline on the mountain.

The bench for the pipeline trench is cut through from the forest to the end of the pipe on the mountain 7 July 2015

The trench is cut and the pipe dragged up onto the mountain.

The trench is dug and the pipe dragged up 8 July 2015

The pipes meet and the connection is made - 9 July.

The pipes meet and the connection is made 9 July 2015

The pipeline reaches the forest track where it will be buried in the uphill bank.

Pipeline reaches the forest track where it will be buried in the uphill bank 15 July 2015

The thin-walled pipe in the upper section of the pipeline is replaced by thicker-walled pipe for the lower sections to withstand the increasing pressure.

Thinwalled pipe for the upper sections of the pipelineThickerwalled pipe for the lower sections of the pipeline

The bank of the forest road is cleared ready for installation of the pipeline.

The bank along the forest track is cleared ready for installation of the pipe 15 July 2015

and Gelli have started work at the weir site:

The temporary access track to the weir site is put in

The temporary access track to the weir in put in 7 July 2015

and reaches the site of the weir.

The temporary access track reaches the weir site 10 July 2015

The first channel to divert the river to the north bank is opened up.

The first channel to divert the river to towards the north bank 10 July 2015

The river is diverted to allow the digger to install the pipes on the south bank which will carry the flow while the weir is built in the river bed.

The river is diverted allowing the digger to install pipes on the south bank to carry the river while the weir is built 15 July 2015

29 July 2015 - a memorable day!

Our turbine arrives in Abergwyngregyn from the USA via Liverpool Docks.

The turbine arrives from the USA in its container via Liverpool Docks 29 July 2015

The Anafon turbine 29 July 2015

The turbine is lifted from its container,

The turbine is lifted from the container 29 July 2015

driven up through the village to the turbine house

The turbine is taken through the village to the power house 29 July 2015

and manoeuvred through the doors.

The turbine is manoeuvred through the power house door 29 July 2015

It is aligned with its mounting

The turbine is aligned over its mounting plate 29 July 2015

and lowered into position.

The turbine in position 29 July 2015

Meanwhile, at the weir site:

The trench for the diversionary pipes is prepared on the south bank of the river.

The ditch to take the diversionary pipes is cleared 18 July 2015

The pipes are installed and the river is diverted through them.

The river is diverted through the pipes on the south bank 28 July 2015

4 August 2015

The weir construction site

The weir construction site 4 Aug 2015

With the river diverted, the reinforcement for the weir foundation is installed

With the river diverted reinforcement for the weir foundation is in place 1 Aug 2015

and the foundation is cast with the reinforcement for the weir wall in position.

The foundation is cast and with the reinforcement for the weir wall prepared 4 Aug 2015

11 August 2015

At the weir

The shuttering for the weir wall is in place

Shuttering for the weir wall in place 11 Aug 2015

13 August 2015

At the weir site

The shuttering is removed to reveal the structure of the weir wall.

The shuttering is removed to reveal the weir structure 13 Aug 2015

Meanwhile at the turbine house

The roof is on ready for laying the sedum turf.

The roof is on ready for laying the turf 13 Aug 2015

The generator and control equipment cabinets are installed.

The generator and control cabinets are in position 13 Aug 2015

The manifold connecting the pipeline to the turbine is in position

The manifold connecting the pipeline to the turbine is installed 13 Aug 2015

and the outlet returning the water from the turbine to the river nears completion.

The outlet returning water from the turbine to the river nears completion 13 Aug 2015

19 August 2015

In Coedydd Aber Forest



The installation of the pipeline reaches the point where the overhead power lines cross the valley

Installation of the pipeline reaches the pylon crossing 13 Aug 2015

and the bank is reinstated.

And the forest road bank is reinstated 19 Aug 2015

The final strings of thick-walled pipe are welded

The final strings of thickwalled pipe are welded 19 Aug 2015

and the last section of the pipeline awaits installation at the bottom of the forest road.

The final section of pipeline awaiting installation at the bottom of the forest road 19 Aug 2015

22 August 2015

At the weir site

The tank and pipework are installed and the pipeline anchor block cast

The Tank and pipework are installed and the anchor block cast 22 Aug 2015

24 August 2015

At the turbine house

The finished turbine house viewed from the gate into the Aber Falls Reserve

The finished turbine house from the gate into the Reserve 24 Aug 2015

compared with the artist's impression published earlier.

Turbine House from the gate into the Reserve 5 May 2015

The finished turbine house viewed from the path returning from the Aber Falls

The finished turbne house returning from the Aber Falls 24 Aug 2015

compared with the artist's impression.

Turbine House  view returning down the path from the Aber Falls

In Coedydd Aber Forest

The steel pipe to take the water down the bank to the turbine house is delivered on site while Alfa Tree Services carry out some last minute tree clearance.

Steel pipe ready for installation down the slope to the turbine house and Alfa Tree Services carrying out some final clearance 24 Aug 2015

28 August 2015

On the pipeline

The steel pipe running down the bank to the turbine house is installed.

The steel pipe is installed up the bank behind the turbine house 27 Aug 2015

The last section of the polyethylene pipe is connected to the steel pipe down the bank to the turbine house.

The polyethylene pipe under the forest road is connected to the steel pipe at the top of the bank 8 Sept 2015

The exposed section of steel pipe is encased in its plastic insulating cover.

The exposed section of the steel pipe is insulated inside a black plastic cover 28 Aug 2015

8 September 2015

On the pipeline

Kevin Williams encounters rock in Coedydd Aber Forest.

Kevin Willams team encounter rock in the lower section of the pipeline through the forest 6 Sept 2015

The final section of pipe in its trench through rock.

The lowest string of polyethylene pipe in its trench through rock 8 Sept 2015

At the weir

Stone walling in progress on the southern bank.

Stone walling in progress on the south bank 28 Aug 2015

The oak cladding of the weir walls is complete.

Timber cladding completed 28 Aug 2015

Heavy rainfall overwhelms the diversion pipes and floods the working area temporarily - 6 September 2015.

Heavy rainfall briefly overwhelms the diversionary pipes and floods the working area 2 Sept 2015

The stone walling on the south bank is completed and the trench is dug for the last section of pipe to the weir.

Stone work on south banl complete and the trench dug for the pipline from the weir 6 Sept 2015

The pipe connecting the buried pipeline to the weir in its trench.

The final section of pipe connects the pipeline to the weir 8 Sept 2015

9 September 2015

At the Turbine House

The Ditch Witch, Scottish Power's directional drilling rig, is tracked up through the village to the turbine house.

Scottish Powers drilling rig the Ditch Witch is tracked up through the village 2 Sept 2015

The Ditch Witch in position behind the turbine house.

The Ditch Witch is positioned behind the turbine house 2 Sept 2015

The rig starts drilling under the river for the grid connection cable - 2 September 2015.

Drilling for the grid connection cable begins 2 Sept 2015

The drill emerges near the pole which will receive the grid connection on the other side of the river after passing through bed rock 4 m below the river bed.

The drill head emerges the other side of the river near the point of connection 9 Sept 2015

The drill head.

The drill head 9 Sept 2015

The red plastic duct for the grid connection cable and earthing wires are attached to the reversing head.

The red plastic duct for the cable and earthing wires are attached to the reversing head 9 Sept 2015

The drill rod and spinning reversing head, with the plastic duct and earthing wires attached, is pulled back down the drill hole.

The drill rods and spinning reversing head are withdrawn dragging the cable duct back under the river 9 Sept 2015

The plastic duct for the grid connection cable is dragged back under the river to the back of the turbine house.

The cable duct is dragged underground 9 Sept 2015

15 September 2015

At the weir



The coanda screen through which water is extracted from the river flow and diverted into the pipeline is installed - 9 September 2015.

The stainless steel Coanda screen is installed 9 Sept 2015

Detail of the coanda screen showing the slots through which water is abstracted.

Detail of the Coanda screen 9 Sept 2015

The diversion pipes are capped and the weir is flooded.

The diversion pipes are capped and the weir is flooded 15 Sept 2015

Turbidity downstream 1 hr after the weir was flooded; by the time the flow reached the pipe bridge, the flow was clear.

Turbidity downstream 1 hour after the weir is flooded 15 Sept 2015

The flow is clear at the weir 4 hr after flooding.

The water is clear below the weir 4 hours after the weir is flooded 15 Sept 2015

The weir in its landscape

The weir in its landscape 20 Sept 2015

The weir in its landscape 23 Sept 2015

24 September 2015

On the pipeline

The pipe is aligned for the final joint. Thirty metres of surplus pipe can be seen in the background, all that's left from the 3 km pipeline!

Pipe is aligned for the final connection 21 Sept 2015

The connector is "eased" over the joint

The connector is eased over the joint 21 Sept 2015

The welding coils built into the connector are activated to complete the final joint in the pipeline.

The builtin welder welding the final joint 21 Sept 2015

The upper section of the pipeline is flushed with water - 23 September 2015.

The upper section of the pipeline to the pipe bridge is flushed with water 23 Sept 2015

The completed pipeline is flushed with water.

The whole pipeline is flushed with water 24 Sept 2015

29 October 2015

On the pipeline

Third valve lucky! Two by-pass valves proved faulty but the third, being installed here, works - 14 October

Third valve lucky! After two faulty by-pass valves a third one is installed and works! 14 October 2015

The now completed pipeline is filled and the pressure of 22.7 bar at the turbine house is maintained indicating that there are no leaks - 15 October

The pipe is filled and the pressure of 22.7 bar is maintained indicating no leaks 15 October 2015

The pipeline is pressure tested. Water is pumped into the pipeline at the weir and the pressure raised to 23.7 bar. No faults are detected - 26-27 October

Water is pumped into the pipeline to pressure test it to 23.7 bar 26 October 2015

After the pipeline has been pressure-tested, all exposed joints are buried and the area behind the Turbine House reinstated - 29 October

After pressure testing the pipeline on 26-27 October, the joints are buried and the area behind the turbine house reinstated 29 October 2015

The forest road above the Turbine House is reinstated - 29 October

The forest road above the turbine house is reinstated 29 October 2015

The bank over the buried pipeline through Coedydd Aber Forest recovers well.

The bank over the buried pipeline recovers well in Coedydd Aber 1 20 November 2015
The bank over the buried pipeline recovers well in Coedydd Aber 2 20 November 2015
The bank over the buried pipeline recovers well in Coedydd Aber 3 20 November 2015
The bank over the buried pipeline recovers well in Coedydd Aber 4 20 November 2015
The bank over the buried pipeline recovers well in Coedydd Aber 5 20 November 2015

20 November 2015

At the Turbine House and on the Powerline

Scottish Power contractors work to upgrade the powerlines above the village to take the power we generate - 16 November

Scottish Power contractors working to upgrade the powerlines above the village 16 November 2015

The grid connection cable is passed through the duct under the river and buried in a trench up to the pole where it connects to the grid. 17 November

Having emerged on the opposite bank, the cable is trenched up to the pole where it connects to the grid 19 November 2015

Emerging from the duct behind the Turbine House, the cable is connected into the sub-station - 19 November

The cable is passed through the duct under the river and connected to the SP sub-station 19 November 2015 is connected

Scottish Power complete the installation of the sub-station at the Turbine House - 20 November

Scottish Power complete the installation of the sub-station in the Turbine House 20 November 2015

Meanwhile, the heavy November rainfall means that we are missing significant generation time - 14 November

With heavy November rainfall the delayed grid connection is costing the community significant lost generation 14 November 2015

26 November 2015

On the Powerline

Scottish Power contractors complete the upgrade of the powerlines from the village to the pole that will take the connection from the Turbine House - 26 November

Scottish Power contractors complete the line upgrade from the village to the connection pole 25 November 2015

The cable running under the river from the Turbine House is run up the pole to connect to the overhead line - 26 November

The cable from the Turbine House is connected to the overhead line 25 November 2015

28 November 2015

At the Turbine House

The underside of the turbine from the sump: the stainless steel Pelton wheel, the deflector which deflects water away from the wheel and stops the turbine if a fault occurs and, in the back wall of the housing, the spear valve which opens to direct the high-pressure jet of water onto the wheel to spin it at 1,000 rpm - 27 November

The turbine from the sump showing the spear valve deflector and Pelton wheel 28 November 2015

The turbine reaches its operating speed of 1,000 rpm during commissioning tests - 27 November

The turbine reaches its operating speed of 1000 rpm and commissioning tests begin 27 November 2015

Generating 230 volts on each of the three lines - 27 November

Generating 230 volts on each of the 3 lines 27 November 2015

The Anafon Hydro is 'on grid' and exporting electricity - 27 November

The Anafon Hydro is on grid and exporting electricity 28 November 2015

The 'Gang of Three' raise a glass! 28 November

The Gang of Three raise a glass! 28 November 2015

From the left: our engineers, Dave Roberts and John Howarth (with Brock), Liz Gatehouse (with Molly - just visible), Hywel Thomas, Ian Crystal and Jacqui Bugden, Gavin Gatehouse - 28 November

Our engineers Dave Roberts and John Howarth the Gang of Three and two out of three partners 28 November 2015

Anthony Clark (Scottish Power) and Dave Roberts carry out our G59 test. We passed which allows us to register for Feed in Tariff payments from today - 30 November

Dave Roberts and Scottish Power carry out our G59 test 30 November 2015

1 December 2015

Mission Accomplished! The Anafon Hydro is up and running a month ahead of schedule and exporting 270 kW to the grid.

Generating 270 kW 1 December

Ein cefnogwyr

Cydnabyddwn yn ddiolchgar gefnogaeth y canlynol:

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  • measuring how many people are using services, so they can be made easier to use and there’s enough capacity to ensure they are fast
  • analysing anonymised data to help us understand how people interact with our website so we can make them better

You can manage these small files and learn more about them from the article, Internet Browser cookies- what they are and how to manage them

Learn how to remove cookies set on your device

There are two types of cookie you may encounter when using our site :

First party cookies

These are our own cookies, controlled by us and used to provide information about usage of our site.

We use cookies in several places – we’ve listed each of them below with more details about why we use them and how long they will last.

Third party cookies

These are cookies found in other companies’ internet tools which we are using to enhance our site, for example Facebook or Twitter have their own cookies, which are controlled by them.

We do not control the dissemination of these cookies. You should check the third party websites for more information about these.

Log files

Log files allow us to record visitors’ use of the site. The CMS puts together log file information from all our visitors, which we use to make improvements to the layout of the site and to the information in it, based on the way that visitors move around it. Log files do not contain any personal information about you. If you receive the HTML-formatted version of a newsletter, your opening of the newsletter email is notified to us and saved. Your clicks on links in the newsletter are also saved. These and the open statistics are used in aggregate form to give us an indication of the popularity of the content and to help us make decisions about future content and formatting.